T.R.I.P. The ongoing conversation...


Norman Evans
presents

 
 
 
T*R*I*P
*Television    *Radio    *Internet     *Print 
 As the paradigm shifts
           from citizen
              to digital citizen
 
by Norman Evans
 
 
" It would seem that we have not found solutions to the problems of today. In no uncertain terms must we let our hope just fade away. "
Albert Einstein
 
“In a democracy, the most important office
is the office of the citizen.”

Justice Louis Brandeis

February 8, 1996 Planet Hollywood, San Francisco
24 hours in Cyberspace.
 
Dan Mapes, “Everybody is talking about the web, web, web; but we don’t walk into a room and say 'hey, there's air in here! When the first lungfish crawled out onto the land and breathed air for the first time, they had conversations about the air. We on the Internet are like the lungfish. We've moved into the air. The web will become our air, the natural state of the future."  Dan Mapes
 
 
April I997
Introduction:
 
The Wager
by Gregory Evans -
 
Pascal, a philosopher and mathematician, argues for believing in God’s existence.  His argument is known as the “wager”.  To summarize Pascal, one must say that it is a wise, safe bet or wager to believe in the existence of an Omnipotent Creator.  If it should be demonstrated that God does not exist, the wager is lost but that is all.  One does not suffer beyond a feeling of dismay that their beliefs have been proven untrue.  However, if the wager is won and God does exist, then the believer is sure to be saved and granted entry to the peaceful world beyond.  In order to make Pascal’s argument stronger, one must only glance at the other side of the coin.  If a person chooses not to believe in the existence of God and his/her beliefs are correct, then the life of that person has not been impacted.  On the other hand, if God did exist the atheist may suffer for his/her “sins” and not be granted admission to heaven or worse.

Norman Evans preaches a similar philosophy today regarding the Internet.  Evans is a strong believer that the internet is the gateway to the future of communication and commerce for the planet.  He believes that the Internet will evolve into the ultimate interactive media appliance.  Many people believe in the power of the Internet, however, many more choose not to believe.  The Internet is seen by many as a dump for electronic junk mail or simply as a place to sell pornography and bad gossip.  People believe it’s too slow, not secure enough, time consuming, frustrating, and most feel that it has no practical application to their business needs.  This is where Evans suggests that people are making an unsafe “wager”.  What if Evans is right?  That the Internet is in its infancy and if supported will evolve into a tool that is even more outreaching than the television and more powerful than the press.  What if one day we look at VHS tapes in the same way we now look at 8-track.


Evans wants to help facilitate the evolution of the Internet so that people and businesses don’t get left behind.  So they don’t “wager” a losing bet. 


 

As the Paradigms Shift

A paradigm is a point of reference. A point of view. A belief system.

For example, five hundred years ago we used to think the earth was flat, we were wrong. It was never flat. Yet for many centuries we believed this to be the case.

 

Now, in the 21st century our view of the world is still divided by cultures and belief systems.

 

When we went to the moon in 1969, we came back with more than moon rocks; we came home with a new view of ourselves. This view of a beautiful small planet, alive with life each dependent on the same air, water and land. If we could see people standing on earth from the perspective of the moon we would see everyone hanging upside down. Like the photographer we have turned it around in our own minds so as we have a believable and acceptable picture of ourselves. It must be right because we have always seen it that way.

 

There are now more than 6.7 billion people in the world. Each and every one of us has a unique point of view and by default we all believe our point of view is the right one. Our point of view is determined by each of our own circumstances and situations. Our point of view continually changes as we move through time and space. Our point of view is influenced by our desires, needs, ability to act and our emotions, history, beliefs, families, friends, teachers and the media.


When JFK made his commitment speech to go to the moon in the sixties it accelerated technology enough to pave the way for people like Gates and Jobs to change the way people work, learn and entertain ourselves. The virtual infrastructure of satellites and cable to connect us all through the Internet and the convergence of television, radio, internet and print onto the cell phone.

 


The new paradigm phenomenon of social networking.

 

In the first decade of the 21st century we have seen an African American President, and it could easily have been a woman, in the White house, the obscure become famous, Susan Boyle, and Iranian’s call for fairness resonating around the globe, in 140 character – 28 word increments. Power to the people, indeed.

This shift is not only from analog to digital, but from citizen to digital citizen.  

 

Most people don’t know what a paradigm is never mind make one, see one shift if it was happening right in front of their noses. What then is a paradigm and why is it important to know about? According to the Oxford dictionary a paradigm is a pattern, example or model. So what is so special about any of those words? On their own, nothing much. However in context a great deal.

 

 

The idea of a paradigm shift is an interesting and powerful notion that is in danger of going the way of other overused words like desktop publishing, information highway or multimedia. It would be tragic if a concept this powerful was not shared with everyone.

 

Q. Are human beings aware of a paradigm shift taking place?

During their lifetime?

 

A. Only by visualizing what it would be like to look backwards from the future, from the point of view of a person living in 2997 and observing the evolution of our planet in retrospect, can we see the paradigms shift and its impact on mankind.

There is no time, only NOW

We are truly becoming “Digital Citizens”


The world around us is changing; it’s moving faster.  We’ve got pagers, cell phones, laptop computers, Internet access.  We’re becoming “digital”, becoming “wired”, becoming “digital citizens”.  And information is rapidly becoming our most precious commodity.

 For a moment, turn back the clock.  Imagine the final days of the last century.  Imagine electricity in it’s infancy.  Imagine the possibilities.  From electricity came applications that changed the world.  Among these applications: radio, telephone, television, computers.


Today the Internet, like electricity before it, is fueling the convergence of conventional media into appliances and applications we have yet to dream of.

 

THEN
I am a digital citizen,
My name is URL:
 registered April 23, 1997
 

April 23, 1997 Date of digitalcitizen.com registration.

 

Within the next 1,000 days humankind will enter the next millennium.

As we approach the end of the 20th century, and begin the countdown on those last 1000 days, we have a wonderful opportunity to plan for our own future.


There has never been a time like this.

Web-time: 100 days on the web is like 365 days in real time.

Countdown to 2001 marks the beginning of a 1,000 day discovery session

In ten time-released editions, 100 days apart, an unfolding strategy will reveal itself.


The words of John Lennon's song, "Imagine there are no countries" never rang more true as they do today with the advent of the Internet.

Internet as the most democratic enabling tool that people have ever experienced.


Two clicks away from the President of the United States or anything or one you want.


The problems of the world will not be solved by one individual, country, corporation, but by all of us sharing and participating in PLANNING THE WORK & WORKING THE PLAN.

 

This evolutionary global discovery session, established on the web, comprising discovery interviews, agenda creation, strategy sessions and seminars.

 

By testing, monitoring and reporting, the tactics, actions and resources to build the plan for our preferred world. For our vision of the next century.

 

UNDERSTANDING THE PRESENT FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE FUTURE

This ongoing status report on the future evolving around us will better prepare us to swim, before we surf.

A strategy for making a better world.....

If we look back at the final days of the last century we see electricity in its infancy.

From electricity came applications like radio, telephone, television, and ultimately computers.

Today the Internet, like electricity before it, is fueling the convergence of all those media into applications and appliances we have yet to dream of.

 

The Internet is the Electricity of the Information Age.

 

With the introduction of low cost devices like web TV more people are using the Internet on their televisions without having the expense of a computer.

 

A massive investment in rewiring the world is already under way. Fibre optic cables deep beneath the oceans are being laid, linking all the continents. Satellites, subterranean cable, telephone and electrical lines are all being utilized to deliver digital services to the biggest global market imaginable. The new Digital Citizens, millions of whom are signing up and getting connected daily.

 

The driving force behind this shift is the Internet.

 

It took television 10 years and it took radio 30 years to achieve this kind of market penetration while the Internet continues to gain momentum.

 

There are more than 5.7 billion people on the planet today all using some form of media to communicate.

 

It is if we are evolving from a passive society of viewers to a connected participatory society of digital citizens, with not only a voice but the most powerful tool of self expression ever developed.

 

Digital Citizen


T.R.I.P. 


As The Paradigm Shifts
from Citizen to Digital Citizen


hosted by: Norman Evans




 

Digital Citizen: The Next 1000 Days

 

The television series will pivot around Norman Evans, a high-tech marketing expert abundant in ideas and vision.

 

Well known in the field, Evans is, as I once characterized him, Nicholas Negroponte without the gloves. Evans is collaborating with Martin Trainor, producer of CTV's  Tomorrow,Today, to produce a series of television segments  espousing the twin concepts of the "Digital Citizen" and the  "Digital Consumer," which will highlight the impact of the  Internet and other communications media on the way people interact, gather information, do business, educate and entertain themselves. This real-time, multimedia-rich, global medium is creating vast new markets and channels, spawning new technologies and solutions, and forcing organizations to reassess their business strategies.

 

Today, there are about 60 million Internet users—twice as many as there were two years ago. It's important to note, however, that the tenet of Evans' show will revolve around technology as the fabric of his audience's, and his subjects', existence, rather than as an end in itself. The TV segments will, as Evans puts it, be the broadcast equivalent of Wired Magazine/CNN meets Connections, the award winning documentary series with James Burke, rather than "just another technology show." They will not be comfy, cozy and truism-ridden. They will discuss issues, not products. They will entertain, inform, occasionally shock, and enlighten. People will discuss the shows around the Brita water filter at work the next day. The show will ooze pizzazz, "in a BMW kind of way." It will make frequent use of live links to web sites and other multimedia channels. Videos and talking heads will emphasize high-profile, high-performing businesspeople and citizens. Advertising media will be examined. It is not intended to be a vehicle for predicting the future. Rather, Evans will set out to "look at the present from the future." The hook for the TV segments—to be aired at regular intervals beginning April 7,

1998, is the Millennium Countdown: 1,000 days to go before  Jan. 1, 2001.

 

Says Evans, "we are not attempting to predict the future. However, by understanding the present from the perspective of the future. We're in the last days of the late 20th century, how will we look when we look back from say the end of the next century - will we be impressed with our behavior, our actions? It's not unlike how we view what we were doing in the last days of the nineteenth century. We can see what was taking place then, electricity was being harnessed, women didn't have the vote, slavery was still in existence, we hadn't learned how to fly. Only by examining the present from the perspective of the future can we determine an action plan that will deliver the kind of planet we want to live in, the sustainable future we want generations to come to inherit."

 

Each segment will air 100 days after the last. Each will take a different twist, and have a different theme. It will be an organic format to reflect the rapid changes in technology and the delivery of this converged digital media. These shows will target an adult demographic (baby boomers) and, as such, will have mature themes, married with an economic/business thrust in which, as the show progresses, savvy corporations that have positioned themselves for the digital climate will be profiled.

 

The technological aspect will be downplayed in the sense that Evans will showcase real-world applications—how people and businesses are using these communication tools effectively to improve their bottom line and/or their lifestyles—rather than the products themselves. In his discussion of the paradigm shift and our changing perceptions of life, technology, media and morality, Evans will touch on controversial topics such as politics, drugs, adultery, as well as providing a commentary on the evolution of the digital universe. All of these themes will be examined in subsequent shows.

 

Interview subjects will include Microsoft chairman Bill Gates, and musician Roger Waters, whose CD 'Amused to Death' paints a graphic picture of the price of civilization, as well as exemplary individuals with unique, or compelling, stories to tell of the transformation impact of the Internet.


Our Vision

Less than 500 days remain until the year 2000.  Whether or not we realize it, as humankind enters this new millennium we are all taking part in a major paradigm shift. 
 
We are all products of our environment- but our environment is rapidly changing.  The microchip, the personal computer, and now the Internet have all revolutionized our relationship with information.  Every day technology is profoundly reshaping our relationship with each other, with information, with media.


What we are witnessing is a convergence from traditional forms of media to digital media and the Internet.

Virtually unknown until the early 1990’s, the Internet is vast becoming a commercial necessity.  We use the Internet for banking, shopping, communicating, educating.  Internet web site addresses bombard us from all directions.  In a nutshell, the World Wide Web represents the single largest departure from the past traditions of media, offering:

 

  24/7:  An unlimited amount of channels, available around the globe, around the clock

  Interactivity:  Instant two way communication between both creator and consumer of information

  Accessibility:  Low overhead for entry to new information and new channels of information

 

These features are what have made the web tantalizing enough to experience seemingly astronomical growth in the past few years.   Despite this, the rapid expansion of the web and the virtual “free-for-all” that has been its guiding principal have led to some problems:

 

  For consumers, the sheer number of choices for accessing and navigating the web are overwhelming.  Additionally, the shifting relationships between advertisers and content creators is making some users uneasy about trusting web content.

 

  For creators of Internet content, maintaining quality websites that are on par with the competition requires continuous support from advertisers who remain reluctant to spend money in an uncertain and immature medium.


 

  For advertisers, the lure of the web is tempered by a confusing array of options.  Advertisers are in search for a clear, dependable way to spend their dollars effectively.

 

Fueling the growth of the Internet as we know it is the interdependent relationship between consumers, producers, and advertisers.  The Internet is still in its infancy, and as with any new medium it will experience growing pains.  The challenge for consumers, producers, and advertisers is to move beyond these problems and anticipate how the convergence of traditional broadcast media (radio and television) with Internet-based media will manifest itself.

 

One thing is certain: the emergence of the Internet as the new broadcast medium is inevitable.  This principle is paramount to our strategies.  The New Media Broadcast Corporation understands how to straddle both the broadcast and the advertising models in both paradigms to successfully merge both broadcast and Internet media.


What is a “new media broadcast” company?


New media, as it is commonly know, is the digital medium.  Many companies have termed themselves “new media” or “digital broadcasters”, without a real understanding of just what it is they are dealing with.  The Internet as a medium is a complex, seemingly limitless network of individuals, services, and connectivity.  Successfully broadcasting in this domain requires a unique understanding of the relationship between consumers, producers, and advertisers.  It requires careful implementation of the promotional, sales, creative and management activities, regardless of whether the broadcast information is text, graphics, video or audio; whether the transmission medium is Internet-based, or a more traditional channel.  And successfully broadcasting in this domain requires the vision and skill to understand the new medium itself.

 

We are extending the traditional of the use of the term “broadcast” which should include all forms of information distribution that is transmitted to the population at large.  In fact, every company with a web page is already a broadcaster.  And if this fact isn’t realized, opportunities are being missed.

 

Preparing for the convergence: the Future Channel

Not all current media will survive the convergence intact.  This fact has many broadcasters scrambling to repurpose and reorganize their efforts.  In many cases, offering conventional programming in a new medium is less than ideal.  This solution is simply “a square peg in a round hole”. 

 

NMBC’s “Future Channel” strategy is to create entirely new programs specifically designed for this convergence.  Our ability to create these new programs comes from our approach, philosophy, and understanding of the new media convergence.  NMBC’s Future Channel programming strategy combines innovative programming with custom technology that we are developing in-house.  By creating these properties and providing an accompanying distribution framework, NMBC will preside over the final convergence of traditional and Internet media.

Our Strategy

NMBC’s core strategy is to offer Internet broadcast and advertising solutions by carefully appealing to the needs of Internet consumers, producers, and advertisers.

 

  Users: NMBC offers a point of entry to the web with a simple, user-friendly interface clearly showing the division between sponsored and unsponsored content.  NMBC’s “portal” to the web offers Internet users a means of accessing a wide range of unique products, services, and broadcast content.  NMBC provides live multi-media broadcast content 24 hours a day, 7 days a week available to web users with any level of connection speed.

 

  Producers: NMBC is, after all, a broadcast corporation, and as such offers a distribution network on popular “channels” for producers of new media and broadcast content.  Additionally, NMBC is developing the tools for producers to develop Future Channel content: web-enhanced content with functionality above and beyond that available to any other broadcast medium.

 

  Advertisers: We offer a single focal point for their online efforts.  Through NMBC, you can broadcast your message online with text, graphics, audio and video or broadcast it offline using NMBC promotional muscle, including standard print media and promotional events.

Our Products

Needs based search engine.
 
NMBC’s product strategy is threefold: Internet properties (including broadcast), Advertising and Marketing services, and Software development. 

Internet Properties

NMBC’s Internet properties focused exclusively on solutions to problems, include a major Internet “portal” site, the Digital Citizen and Digital Consumer websites, the Future Channel broadcast network, and several other properties that NMBC is in the process of acquiring and/or collaborating with.

 

1. The NMBC Portal

Content in Context
The main focus of our Internet properties is the NMBC portal site, the front-door to NMBC’s many Internet properties and services.  The overall goal of this project is to put a friendly face on the web for new users and, in doing so, make in the Internet accessible to the other four-fifths of North American households not yet connected.  The portal site offers a revolutionary approach aimed at attracting and keeping newcomers to the Internet- simplicity, and honesty.  The philosophy is simple: right now, as new users approaches the web they are immediately confused by the myriad of starting points available to them.  There are literally hundreds of sites calling users to “Start Here”, and after choosing a starting path users are bombarded with cluttered pages filled with ads hawking everything from fresh flowers to new cars.  We propose another way to start your web experience: with a simple clean, uncluttered interface.

 

After logging on, the user sees only the comforting image of our planet Earth. Click it and be presented with simple, succinct choices that divide the web into logical sections – no ads, no hidden “sells”. In order to gain the trust of the Internet consumer, it is key to assure users that the content at this point is “honest” and not paid for by advertisers.  In answer to “What is the best site to buy a car?”, users should be told the best place to buy a car and not the place that wrote the biggest check to the webmaster.


2. Digital Citizen

W.Y.N.I.W.Y.G. What You Need Is What You Get.

The Digital Citizen view of the world is a moon-view of the world above the satellite. A view that is solely focused on the needs of the citizen where ever they are in life. Devided into fundamental need categories consisting of rights o, government,

The Digital Citizen site embodies the true philosophy of the Internet: a global village of information, contacts, networks, and services free of boundaries and corporate sponsorship.  It is dedicated to provide each citizen the opportunity to communicate easily and effortlessly with others, be it around the globe, the country, the region, the city, or around the neighborhood.

 In essence, the Digital Citizen property is a guide to the world through the eyes of the Internet offering direct access to government and charity-based content, served up in a logical and friendly manner - all without the hindrance of advertising.

 

3. Digital Consumer

Through Digital Consumer, all of the products and services the wired world has to offer are only a short few mouse clicks away.  The thrust of this effort is to aggregate web content for consumers, providing virtually all the services and information the web has to offer.  From the Digital Consumer site, users can check the weather, read local and global news, shop online, bank, explore the digital world.  Digital Consumer is a full-featured portal site combining dynamic web content with information, services and NMBC’s broadcast programming.

From an advertisers point-of-view, Digital Citizen presents a single focal point for marketing and PR efforts by tying together print, mass-mailing, on-air and on-line promotions.  The simple fact is that there are literally hundreds of sites competing for advertising dollars. Understanding how to effectively spend advertising dollars in a constantly changing medium is a difficult task at best.  By offering Internet consumers a “one-stop-shop” for Internet content, products, and services and by tracking user demographics, NMBC can effectively offer advertisers a solution to the daunting task of marketing to a new and uncertain medium.

 

The Digital Consumer

A user-friendly starting point for all web-based products and services

A focal point for accurately and effectively marketing to a wired world

 

4. The Future Channel: programming for the new media

NMBC is, above all else, a “new media” broadcast company.  And Future Channel is programming for the new media.  NMBC’s core strategy with Future Channel involves combining innovative online programming augmented with content specifically designed to take advantage of the Internet as a new medium. 

Programming on demand

The Internet offers broadcasters many advantages over conventional broadcast media.  First and foremost is programming on demand: Internet programming can be enjoyed at the convenience of the user audience.  Made possible by audio and video “streaming” technologies and advances in storage technologies, web users can enjoy programs as they are broadcast live, or they can choose to enjoy these same programs at a later time.  Quality programming “on demand” is paramount to Future Channel, served 24/7: around the globe, around the clock.

 

Augmented New Media content

The second major advantage that the Internet allows broadcasters is the ability to offer different forms of digital media all within the same program.  That is, text, graphics, audio and video can be broadcast to users all at once, in new and innovative ways.  Taking advantage of a digital transport medium allows NMBC to augment standard programming with new media content that is informative and interactive.  Imagine a video channel that enhances radio programming.  Imagine a secondary video program within a television program to enhance the viewing experience.  Imagine interactive computer programming that empowers users to dynamically change and enhance broadcast content to suit their needs.  This is at the heart of the Future Channel strategy: content created specifically for the Internet, designed to take advantage of all the possibilities this new medium has to offer.

 Scalable bandwidth: the NMBC solution

Television and radio have a fixed bandwidth.  The Internet does not.  Unfortunately, at this moment, web content is mostly a yes or no solution.  The majority of Internet programming fails to scale to the bandwidth available to users, and fails to offers active media delivered in real time.  NMBC’s proprietary NMBC technology will allow the creation of live multimedia programming that can ramp up to the available bandwidth available to web audiences by adapting different content for different users.

 

It’s not rocket science.  Bandwidth is analogous to water flowing through a pipe.  If you’ve got a “thin” pipe, you can only pump so much water through the pipe.  But put in a “fat” pipe and you can enjoy as much water as you can get.  The same applies for data sent through the internet.  Future Channel’s programming is broadcast with text, images, audio and video.  Users with low-bandwidth connections to the Internet see only the basic programming as text.  As more bandwidth becomes available, or as the pipe “fattens” up, users will take advantage of images, audio, and video to enhance Future Channel’s broadcast programming, all available through the NMBC portal and the Digital Consumer site.


Advertising and Marketing Services

The key to successfully appealing to advertisers is simple: understand their needs.  To spend valuable advertising dollars in a uncertain and immature medium is a considerable risk, one that advertisers are becoming more leery to take.  NMBC offers an alternative to online advertisers that makes sense.  This alternative: a single focal point to effectively spend advertising dollars.

 NMBC’s properties include quality Future Channel broadcast programming, Internet portal sites, product and services web sites, and a host of other high profile web properties.  Through NMBC’s media services advertisers can reach a sizable viewing audience with a well-known demographic profile across the digital landscape.  However, NMBC can also offer advertisers a more traditional route in addition to online marketing, including print and direct-mail campaigns.  This is why advertisers will choose NMBC to spend their advertising budgets.  Some of NMBC’s concurrent marketing activities:

Sherpa Browser

NMBC’s customized web Browsers, codename “Sherpa” is the next evolution in web existence.  Not only does Sherpa have all the built-in capabilities to run the latest web technologies, including SOMA and AfterFlash, but Sherpa also incorporates advanced planning and scheduling utilities.  Sherpa’s planning software allows web users to carefully track, plan, and analyze their day-to-day web existence and plan for the long-term.  Sherpa easily collects web content and keeps track of the important details, so users don’t have to.  Keep track of email and contact names?  That’s second nature to Sherpa.  Plan to get concert tickets?  Sherpa updates you on your favorite artists.  Sherpa even marks your favorite web sites and updates you when new content becomes available.

 

Sherpa provides a simple means for NMBC audiences to keep up-to-date on NMBC affiliate sites and content, and to have the current web-technologies at their fingertips.

 

 

It’s all about you. The world revolves around your ears. There are more than 6.7 billion people in the world. Each and every one of us has a unique point of view and all believe their point of view to be the right one. How can that be with so many wars and hatred and blame in the world?

 

If only we had the power t o see ourselves as other see us. ( see Robert Burns poem – To alice.)

 

Our point of view is determined by each of our own backgrounds, circumstances and situations. All of us believe in something.

 

It’s all about you. The world revolves around your ears. There are 6.7 billion people in the world and everyone of them has unique point of view, an d all of them believe their view to be right. Yet how can this be with so many wars and hatred and blame in the world? If only we had the power t o see our selves as other see us. ( see Robert Burns poem – To alice.)

 

You can’t use the visible to explain the invisible

 

Belief; We used to believe in many gods, then one and now with science, none.

This view continually changes as we move through time and space. It is governed by our desires, needs and ability to act, by our unconscious, emotions, history, beliefs, families, friends, teachers, religion and the media.

We are like the photographer 100 or more years before who would look at his subject and see them upside down and inverted. When satisfied that everything was in frame, he would come out from under his cloth covered box camera and see his photograph ‘right way up’ and take his shot.  We have in some respects become like the photographer, we look at our world and see the world as it has always been, this way up, and that since we have always had wars as a way of solving problems, and that the combustion engine was a good idea, until we now see that some of those things that we believed to be the right way up have been proven was quite the opposite. 

Even the idea of a flat earth or that the sun revolved around the earth were belief systems or points of view that if not shared often resulted in torture or execution. Then one day it is agreed that the earth is indeed flat and revolves around the sun.

Ooops.  I wonder of anyone ever actually every apologized for this misconception.

 

When we went to the moon in 1969, we came back with more than moon rocks, we came home with a new view of ourselves. This view of a beautiful small planet, alive with life each dependent on the same air, water, and land as each other.  If we could see the people standing on the earth from the perspective of the moon we would see that we are all hanging upside down like bats. And like the photographer we have turned it around in our own minds so as we have a believable and acceptable picture of ourselves and our behavior.  It must be right because we have always seen it that way.

 

When JFK made his commitment speech to go to the moon in the sixties it accelerated technology enough to pave the way for people like Gates and Jobs to change the way people work, learn and entertain ourselves,  and to create the virtual infrastructure of satellites and cable to connect us all through the Intranet and the eventuality of the cell phone, G.P.S. and the phenomenon of social networking and the empowerment of the individual to have a voice. It paved the way for Americans in first decade of the 21st century to vote an African American into the White House, for the obscure to become famous; Susan Boyle, and Iranian’s call for fairness resonating around the globe, in 140 character – 28 word increments. Power to the people, indeed.

 In his book the Audacity of Hope, Senator Obama quoted Judge Brandeis of the Supreme Court as saying that the most powerful office in land was not that of the president but of the citizen, and this we are seeing being exercised with every tweet and every email.

 THE WEB-SITE digitalcitzen.com  COUNTDOWN, 1ST 100  DAY BETA PROGRAM

 THE TELEVISION SHOW-FUTURE CHANNEL

 In the next 1000 days, tens of billions of dollars will be invested on rewiring the world. Subterranean cables linking the continents with fibre-optics cables capable of transmitting gigabytes of data in the blink of an eye. Companies and governments everywhere are betting the farm on digital convergence. Cable companies, telephone, software, hardware, networking companies, and satellite companies all have an enormous vested interest in global digital acceptance. Investments to deliver services to whom? 

You.

The Digital Citizen.

The Digital Consumer.

 

Wired magazine teamed up recently with Merrill Lynch Forum to develop what they dubbed the Digital Citizen Survey.  Conducted by Luntz Research Companies, a poll 1,444 Americans was conducted to examine their view on technology and society and the attitudes and beliefs of individuals at the leading edge of the digital revolution.

See Wired December 1997. The Netizen, Jon Katz, article excerpts. ‘

Move over “soccer moms’ and “angry white males,” the Wired /Merrill Lynch Forum Survey reveals that the new bellwether is The Digital Citizen. The first in depth poll finds Digital Citizens are optimistic, tolerant, civic-minded, and radically committed to change.’

‘The survey reveals that there is indeed a distinct group of Digital Citizens. Profoundly optimistic about the future, they’re convinced that technology is a force for good and that our free-market economy functions as a powerful engine of progress.’

The Internet, it turns out is not a breeding ground for disconnection, fragmentation, paranoia, and apathy. Digital Citizens re not alienated, either from other people or from civic institutions. Nor are they ignorant of our systems inner workings, or indifferent to the social and political issues our society must confront. Instead, the online world encompasses many of the most informed and participatory citizens we have or are likely to have. I am a digital citizen!

 

On April, 7 1998 we start a countdown to the new millennium, January, 1, 2001. The last 1000 days of the 20th century. Measured out for our purposes into 10 web years.  A web year measuring 100 days. Technology is exploding in every direction. What does the 'networked society' mean to you, your business, education, government, country, world and future?

 

Where do you want to be? What do you want to be doing?  Do you have a vision of your future? A Plan?

The first segment, “A Day In The Life,” will air April 4, 1998, the date that marks 1,000 days before the year 2001.   In a quest to arrest that moment in time, known as NOW, Evans will look at what’s happening on the planet today in business, current affairs, entertainment and the arts. ‘Where Hollywood meets business. The camera will follow Evans around the set as he walks around and looks at computer/TV monitors displaying Web sites and current events. Evans will use this data to support his theory that we are all share a collective memory, if not a consciousness perpetuated by the media.

 

The Internet is the Electricity of the Information Age.

We are, says Evans, living through a paradigm shift, which at the same time is settling over us as naturally as the air we breathe. It’s an insidious evolution. Says Evans: “ My father recounts a story when he was about four or five years old in Belfast, in 1915.  He remembers peering into a store with a few of his friends, noses pressed to the plate glass window, staring, bewildered at how this solitary light bulb, worked. ‘I saw a man press that button on the wall and it went on, press it again and it went off-magic!’ his informative friend proudly stated. Well, eighty five years later we are no different than those innocent children, most of us are staring at the Internet, this ‘new electricity’ and we think it’s magic!

We have the opportunity to participate in a moment as potent Kitty Hawk, as walking on the moon, the world is being rewired in preparation of low cost, easy to use Intelligent TV/ Information/Digital Appliances. All roads lead to the door of the Digital Citizen. Wired defines the Digital Citizen in four categories, Super Connected who exchange e mail three times a week, have a laptop, cell phone, beeper and a home computer. The Connected, who use email three days a week and three of the four other tasks. The Unconnected do not use any of the targeted technologies and the Semi-connected at least one but not more than four of the target technologies.

 

Digital Citizens: The Next 1000 Days

The proposed television series will pivot around Norman Evans, a high-tech marketing expert abundant in ideas and vision, who also has the business savvy to put them into practice. (Insert impressive bits of bio here.)

Well known in the field, Evans is, as I once characterized him, Nicholas Negroponte without the gloves. Evans is collaborating with Martin Trainor, producer of CTV’s Tomorrow,Today, to produce a series of television segments espousing the twin concepts of the “Digital Citizen” and the “Digital Consumer,” which will highlight the impact of the Internet and other communications media on the way people interact, gather information, do business, educate and entertain themselves. This real-time, multimedia-rich, global medium is creating vast new markets and channels, spawning new technologies and solutions, and forcing organizations to reassess their business strategies.

Today, there are about 60 million Internet users—twice as many as there were two years ago. It’s important to note, however, that the tenet of Evans’ show will revolve around technology as the fabric of his audience’s, and his subjects’, existence, rather than as an end in itself.

The TV segments will, as Evans puts it, be the broadcast equivalent of Wired Magazine/CNN meets Connections, the award winning documentary series with James Burke, rather than “just another technology show.” They will not be comfy, cozy and truism-ridden. They will discuss issues, not products. They will entertain, inform, occasionally shock, and enlighten. People will discuss the shows around the Brita water filter at work the next day. The show will ooze pizzazz, “in a BMW kind of way.” It will make frequent use of live links to web sites and other multimedia channels. Videos and talking heads will emphasize high-profile, high-performing businesspeople and citizens. Advertising media will be examined. It is not intended to be a vehicle for predicting the future. Rather, Evans will set out to “look at the present from the future.”

The hook for the TV segments—to be aired at regular intervals beginning April 4, 1998, is the Millenium Countdown: 1,000 days to go before Jan. 1, 2001..

 As Evans puts it, "we are not attempting to predict the future, this is an exercise in futility. However, by understanding the present from the perspective of the future. We’re in the last days of the late 20th century, how will we look when we look back from say the end of the next century - will we be impressed with our behavior, our contribution? It’s not unlike how we view what humans were doing in the last days of the nineteenth century. We can see what was taking place then, electricity was being harnessed, women didn’t have the vote, slavery was still in existence, we hadn’t learned how to fly. Only by examining the present from the perspective of the future can we determine an action plan that will deliver the kind of planet we want to live in., the sustainable future we want generations to come to inherit."

Each segment will air 100 days after the last. Each will take a different twist, and have a different theme. It will be an organic format to reflect the rapid changes in technology and the delivery of this converged digital media. These shows will target an adult demographic (baby boomers) and, as such, will have mature themes, married with an economic/business thrust in which, as the show progresses, savvy corporations that have positioned themselves for the digital climate will be profiled.

The technological aspect will be downplayed in the sense that Evans will showcase real-world applications—how people and businesses are using these communication tools effectively to improve their bottom line and/or their lifestyles—rather than the products themselves. In his discussion of the paradigm shift and our changing perceptions of life, technology, media and morality, Evans will touch on controversial topics such as politics, drugs, adultery, as well as providing a commentary on the evolution of the digital universe. All of these themes will be examined in subsequent shows. Interview subjects will include Microsoft chairman Bill Gates, and musician Roger Waters, whose CD ‘Amused to Death’ paints a graphic picture of the price of civilization, as well as exemplary individuals with unique, or compelling, stories to tell of the transformation impact of the Internet.

THE FUTURE CHANNEL is the end product of the convergence of all media. It is how we will be buying, selling, educating and entertaining ourselves through a twenty-four hour seven day a week distribution channel that combines web, television & the telephone

 

Evans predicts that all media will converge and the Internet as we know it will disappear. This convergence will be fuelled by the introduction of the intelligent-interactive TV. This new appliance will act as the interface to this interactive, on-demand world of 500 channels and millions of web sites to choose from.

We are beginning to see this happen with the introduction of set-top box technology where viewers can surf the net from their television.

 

THE FUTURE CHANNEL brings all forms of technology in use into a positive light, demonstrating that some technologies are mere processes that don’t require anything more than our learning, to enhance our life experience and prepare ourselves for the inevitable changes that the future promises.

There has never been a time like this, we have no historical frame of reference, no empirical data to guide us into the knowledge age. It is as if our children are from the future, being educated by people from the past.

  The direct mail campaign: NMBC will target individuals and the public with strategic direct-marketing campaigns derived from advertising and survey information.  Advertisers will be able to appeal to the public through coupon books and promotional material designed to drive the public online, towards advertisers.

 

  The Plan-Your-Life workbook: Using the concept of planning for the future, NMBC will release a workbook package complete with CD-ROM in bookstores appealing to the remaining four-fifths of North American households not currently connected to the Internet.  The workbook concept is designed to drive consumers online with the concept of planning to understand the new medium.

 

  The Future Channel Show: the Future Channel Show represents one of NMBC’s hot broadcast properties: a technology-driven show devoted to covering the evolutionary convergence towards Internet media.  In an interview format with key speakers, NMBC can devote time to examples of marketing online including NMBC’s own advertisers.

 

  Advertiser Events: To announce and publicize online events, press-releases and events will be held in a public forum.  Advertisers and speakers will be invited to provide public exposure towards NMBC’s online properties and advertisers.  Print, television, and web-casts of the events will be an essential part of NMBC’s marketing strategies.  Note that the first such event is scheduled for September 24, 1998 at SkySpace in Toronto.

 

Software Development

The New Media Broadcast Corporation has strong roots in new media technologies.  The notion of Internet broadcasting extends far beyond simply sending images and video to the masses.  And an integral part of NMBC’s long term plan is the development and deployment of custom software technologies.  At the moment, NMBC is developing four main projects.

 

Net-Jockey

Net-Jockey is a broadcast technology system for producers of Internet and new media content.  Net Jockey’s broadcast encoder allows producers of internet audio and video programs to augment their primary content with a secondary “channel” to provide additional text, images, audio and video.  Audiences of Net-Jockey enhanced programming view this additional “channel” through one of the Internet’s most popular broadcast applications, the RealPlayer G2.  The RealPlayer application is installed on millions of computers worldwide and comes bundled with Microsoft’s Windows 98 software.  The near complete market penetration of RealPlayer ensures that content created with Net-Jockey can be viewed by the majority of Internet users without having to download additional plugins, and ensures that Net-Jockey content will be viewed on every available hardware platform.

 

Conceptually this system offers something that no other broadcast technology has made use of: bandwidth-scalable content.  In essence, it allows the creation and delivery of live multimedia programming that can ramp up to the available bandwidth of each individual user.  For users with low-bandwidth connects, only basic text programming is viewable.  As more bandwidth becomes available, users take advantage of images, audio and video.

 

Net-Jockey technology is key to the creation of content for NMBC’s Future Channel programming.

 

NMBC’s customized web Browsers, codename “Sherpa” is the next evolution in web existence.  Not only does Sherpa have all the built-in capabilities to run the latest web technologies, including SOMA and AfterFlash, but Sherpa also incorporates advanced planning and scheduling utilities.  Sherpa’s planning software allows web users to carefully track, plan, and analyze their day-to-day web existence and plan for the long-term.  Sherpa easily collects web content and keeps track of the important details, so users don’t have to.  Keep track of email and contact names?  That’s second nature to Sherpa.  Plan to get concert tickets?  Sherpa updates you on your favorite artists.  Sherpa even marks your favorite web sites and updates you when new content becomes available.

 


 

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